Showing posts with label Churchill. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Churchill. Show all posts

24 April 2016

ANZAC Day, pause a moment

ANZAC Day 100 years on:

Australia and New Zealand pauses today to remember their war fallen.
101 years ago today, the fateful landings to try and secure a strangle-hold on the Dardanelles forged the nationhood of the antipodean cousin countries as we know it today. 

100 years ago the first ANZAC commemoration services were held. 
Lest we forget. 

Sacrifices that thousands have made on the battlefields of the world to guarantee our freedom. 

Sometimes in error, sometimes in folly, sometimes with intent on a common goal or idea. 

Never the less, lives sacrificed.

It was Winston Churchill's brain-child to force open the way to Constantinople through the Dardanelles straits to the Bosporus, allowing Russia, who was access to the Aegean. 

He tried first with the Royal Navy, assisted by French and Russian ships, but was given a bloody nose by the Turkish forts and gun emplacements. 

The fateful decision was then made to take the approaches by land, across the Gallipoli peninsula.

I am currently reading Peter Fitzsimons' book, written from the Australian perspective. 

The history is probably familiar to many, so I am not going to dwell on that. 

It suffices to say that it was a massive waste of lives. On both sides. 

Not only was there massive sacrifice by New Zealanders and Australians, but many other nations took part in the futile assault. Indian and Gurkha troops, French, British, Canadian and many other allied countries. 

What I did learn from the red bandanna wearing Australian's book, is the interesting role  

Captain Henry Stoker and the crew of AE2. The stuff of legends. 
The submarine has subsequently been found, and remains in the sea of Marmara

The narrow stretch of land known as ANZAC cove

The forbidding terrain

British troops attacking at Gallipoli 

Cease-fire to allow both sides to bury their dead. 
ANZACs in the foreground, Turks in the background

Memorial to Mustaf Kemal (later honoured as Ataturk) 
The Turkish commander whose skills as commander swung the battle the way of the Turks. 

Numerically, the Turks suffered more casualties that the Allies put together.

Lest we forget

28 May 2014

Discovery: The Cobbaton Collection

I came across this on the net today: The Cobatton collection
Photographed by Jay Wilkinson

Photo Jay Wilkinson (No copyright infringement intended)

I have never heard of this collection, but what a treasure trove!
The presence of an AVRE Petard Mortar above in particular caught my fancy!

Eclectic and priceless, and by the looks of things well worth a visit if you're going to the UK!

Link: The Cobbaton Collection (clicky)

and their official site: The Cobbaton Combat Collection

Lots of detail, but sparse in photographs.
Love the tagline though, " a hobby that got out of hand"
Sounds all to familiar!

26 August 2013

KWC refights Kursk: Prokhorovka

The Kapiti Wargames Club re-fought 

The Battle of Kursk's deciding battle, Prokhorovka, at the weekend:

Much like the initial stages of Operation Zitadelle it appeared that Army Group South may succeed in encircling the Soviets:

More photos and brief battle report on the KWC website:

9 June 2013

WW2 Curiosity photographs

Some WW2 Curiosity photographs

Hitler's shredded tweeds after the Wolfschanze blast (attempt on his life)

Stalin horsing around

Hitler delighted at the Volkswagen (Ferdinand Porsche, the designer at left)

Churchill (The First Sea Lord) emerging from the sea

Incoming over Moscow


Downed Kamikaze

Contrails and Fire in the sky
London Blitz

7 October 2012

What is an army without opposition ?

Having spent some time on refurbishing my Wehrmacht and expanding its capabilities, it was only fair to do the same for my Allied armies. The Russians in particular were under strength  with regards to tanks and artillery.

This was soon rectified by adding a couple of T34/76s and IS 2s, a refurbished M40 155mm SP Howitzer

The Artillery received a couple of towed howitzers, 17 and 14 pounder guns, complete with tractors and limbers.Softskinned vehicles for support and HQ use.

A GMC truck with a .50 cal mounted, and two M3s with the same for troop transports

M3s with 75mm antitank guns act as tank destroyers. The first troops to receive a lick of paint were the Late War European Front Brits. The Yankees and Russkis are still languising without base coats. Have at least been removed off the sprues. A box full of ANZACs and Gurkas have also been obtained via Trademe, as well as some 8th Army Africa/Italy Commonwealth troops.

IS 2s (Josef (Iosef) Stalin), Sherman Jumbos and SP Howitzer

M3 Half track Troop Carriers and Tank Destroyers

Late war Sherman Fireflies and Churchill VI

"Easy-Eight" Sherman and GMC truck toting .50 cal MG

More Shermans


Alongside the IS2s to show relative size

Morris Gun Tractors with 17lb and 14lb Guns, Howitzers, German Summer Army in background